Why There are Few Female Airline Pilots?

Why There are Few Female Airline Pilots?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com The aviation industry has a long and rich history. It has numerous breakthroughs and accomplishments, but why do we always associate these great things with men? In general, the roles of women in this field aren’t as recognized as they should be.   In this age, women are achieving great things. There are a lot of successful and acclaimed accountants, doctors, designers, etc. But when it comes to female pilots, there is very little that we hear about. We need to address this issue to further inspire females not just to become pilots, but to pursue whatever career that they wish to excel on.   Issues to overcome Aviation is a highly male-dominant field. According to a 2006 study called Gender issues in aviation: pilot perceptions and employment relations, women are put off by the “masculine beliefs, values, and perceptions [that] appear to continue to dominate the industry.” The research also stated reports of assault, concupiscent dialogue, and sexism toward women.   Airlines around the world are addressing and providing solutions for such issues. For example, United Airlines spokesperson stated that the airline has no tolerance for such situations and would be very quick to inflict penalty or sanction to anyone who performs any type of harassment toward its crew, especially female pilots.   Destroying barriers Due to the global shortage of active commercial pilots, airlines are striving to make the position a lot more appealing to both men and women. Qantas, for example, is aiming to ‘up the ante’ by hiring more female pilots into their company. Just recently, Air India has operated an all-female...
Does an Aircraft Have a Key?

Does an Aircraft Have a Key?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com When we think of vehicles, we immediately associate them with keys for ignition, doors, and compartments. The key provides security and safety of the vehicle along with everything contained inside of it. Thus, it’s reasonable for airplanes to have a key considering how large and valuable they are. But is that really the case? You’d be surprised to learn that when it comes to aircraft, bigger commercial jets like the Boeing 747 do not have keys. Accessing the boarding door and the ignition can be accessed and turned on respectively without the need for a key. However, there are some private jets that actually do have keys, but not all. These smaller aircraft are owned and used by individuals. Does This Make the Keyless Aircraft More Prone to Theft? The short answer is no. When not in use, passenger jets are housed in airport hangars which are heavily guarded by surveillance cameras and security personnel. Moreover, airline staff and passengers can only gain access to the aircraft via moveable stairs or a jet bridge. These things, like the aircraft, are also protected by airport security and cannot be used by unauthorized persons. The ignition for most large aircraft also does not require a key. But what if some random person somehow managed to get inside the cockpit without getting caught? Can they simply push the “Start” button and successfully take the plane for themselves? Well, not really. First of all, there is no simple “Start” button. Starting an aircraft engine is complex and requires training. A lot of buttons, knobs, and levers need to be manipulated...
Female Pilots

Female Pilots

Photo Credit: pixabay.com There are many industries that are characterized by their complexity, importance, and meaningfulness. Medicine, finance, and technology are three examples, and in those three, women have been playing such crucial roles. Aviation is also an important field, but the roles of women in this field seem to be more obscure despite their decisive contributions. It is time to change that. As aviation continues to progress, women must be recognized as much as their male colleagues for all the great things they’ve done for the industry. Notable Women in Aviation History was made when Emily Howell Warner, an American airline pilot, became the first woman to regularly fly a commercial jetliner back in 1973. This was a monumental time for women who initially only dreamt of being able to enter the aviation industry as a pilot. Prior to that, women have already been breaking stereotypes in the flight industry with their skills, intelligence, and perseverance. Bessie Coleman is well-known for being the first African-American to ever receive her license in 1921. In March 1927, Millicent Bryant became the first woman to receive her pilot’s license to fly a private jet in Australia. Katherine Sui Fun Cheung also made a memorable achievement when she received her private pilot’s license in 1932. Cheung is the first woman of Chinese descent to ever receive a pilot’s license in the US. Diversification Between the years 2010 and 2014, there has been an increase of 800 women with the license to pilot an airliner, but overall, females only make up for 3-4% of airline pilots. Airline companies, along with the entire aviation...
A Flight Engineer’s Career

A Flight Engineer’s Career

Photo Credit: pixabay.com A flight engineer also called an air engineer, is the member of an aircraft’s flight crew who monitors and operates complex aircraft systems. In most modern aircraft, their complex systems are both monitored and adjusted by electronic microprocessors and computers, resulting in the elimination of the flight engineer’s position. So, what does a Flight Engineer do? A flight engineer is responsible for ensuring that all components of the plane are in proper working order. It is their duty to make any of the repairs if a mechanical issue does arise. Flight engineers are also used to interpret complicated flight-related gauges and instruments, and to help pilots with navigation. However, several of these duties have been diminished due to the emergence of automated computer programs which are capable of performing several of the same duties at a cheaper cost. Regardless, flight engineers are still widely used by the military and by companies with larger aircraft. This is because military aircraft use the most recent technology, operate under different systems than commercial airlines, and are at higher risk of attack or mechanical problems. Certain countries also have laws requiring all three and four engine airplanes to carry a licensed flight engineer. A flight engineer’s career includes an extensive list of roles both on and off the ground. Before takeoff begins, they must inspect the aircraft and ensure that it is safe for use. They often have a pre-flight checklist that has to be completed before a plane is cleared to fly. These include checks for any fluid leaks or improperly inflated tires. Once the plane is airborne, the...
Some Cool Facts About Planes

Some Cool Facts About Planes

Photo Credit: pixabay.com You already know that planes fly and they take us to places, but do you know that there are some interesting facts about airplanes don’t know about? Read on for the top cool facts about planes from various sources (i.e., Reader’s Digest, DailyMail Online, Travel and Leisure and Fact Retriever). The long, thin body of an aircraft is called the fuselage, and at the end of the fuselage is where the pilots man the plane, which is called the cockpit. Aircraft wings feature a shape called an airfoil which is designed to create lift as the plane moves through the air. As the airplane flies, the air pressure below and above the wings is different, which keeps the airplane airborne. This difference of pressure is termed as “lift.” The little hole in the airplane window is necessary to regulate cabin pressure. Airplane windows are made up of multiple panels, so the hole helps the middle panel from becoming stressed with pressure during flight. When a plane lands at night, cabin crews will dim the interior lights, since in the event that the landing goes badly and evacuating passengers will have their eyes already be adjusted to the darkness. White lines in the sky that follow the plane’s trail are called vapor trails or contrails, which is the result of fuel being burned; it produces carbon dioxide and water, which condenses into tiny droplets behind a plane in the air. The internet and on-line check-in was first used by Alaska Airlines in 1999. Airplanes are lightning-proof. There are about 200,000 flights airborne every day, across the world. The...